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Broadband in Oberon January 9, 2008

Posted by ctcoberon in Uncategorized.
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This year, more than any other, is the year we should see many ICT (Information & Communications Technology) services either activated or firm timetables set for their introduction.

  • For example, in December 2007 it was confirmed that 2013 will be the date that digital TV will be fully activated and the current analogue system switched-off.
  • Also, in 2008 we should see a firm data set for the activation or introduction of digital radio across Australia.
  • With so much talk about 3G telecommunication (Telephone and Internet) services being activated this month and the old CDMA service being switch-off along with all the talk about digital TV, set-top boxes, LCD and Plasma TVs etc., its little wonder we have forgotten about digital radio.

However, from a commercial view point the building of a FTTN (fibre to the node) network is paramount. Fibre to the node (FTTN) is a telecommunication architecture based on fibre-optic cables run to a cabinet (or telephone exchange) serving a neighbourhood. Customers connect to this cabinet using traditional coaxial cable or twisted pair wiring. Fibre to the node allows delivery of broadband services such as high speed Internet. The data rates vary according to the exact protocol used and according to how close the customer is to the cabinet. Unlike the competing fibre to the premises (FTTP) technology, fibre to the node can use the existing coaxial or twisted pair infrastructure to provide last mile service. For this reason, fibre to the node costs less to deploy. However, it also has lower bandwidth potential than fibre to the premises.

Broad Band Options 

  • For many rural people their only options will either be wireless (3G) or two-way satellite.
  • The Australian Government’s website (www.dbcde.gov.au) lists about 30 companies under the Australian Broadband Connect Program who can offer rural people an inexpensive and reliable Broadband service, but remember not all providers cover the whole of Australia.
  • For example, in our area the best know providers are: Australian Private Network (activ8), LiSP and Telstra.  Visit this link and fill in your address details and you will be presented with a list of broadband providers in your area.
    http://bcoms.dcita.gov.au/BSL/Welcome.do;jsessionid=18B7E77E1C562BB529BDA7568E0F1B25.caosl
  • If you are eligible for the subsidy, please do your homework, as some providers will request an installation fee or an equipment fee or both, while others may not!
  • As for the monthly service this starts at 512/128kbps with a 1,000MB (1GB) download and pricing will vary depending upon whether it is wireless or two-way satellite service.
  • Although, this is an improvement upon what was once available it is still a far cry from what is offered in other parts of the world. For example, a CWA survey published in May 2007 states the average access speed for various countries is as follows: Japan 61mbps, South Korea (45mbps) Netherlands (21.7mbps), Sweden (18mbps), France (17mbps) Canada (7.6mbps), Poland (7.5mbps) Germany (6mbps) United States (4.8mbps) UK (2.6mbps) and Greece (1mbps). However, some countries like for example Norway may have by now, speeds upwards of 100mbps. So, if Australia is to compete on a world stage through the use of technology like the Internet, we still have a long way to go.   

Broadband Service Locator
Visit this link and fill in your address details and you will be presented with a list of broadband providers in your area.
http://bcoms.dcita.gov.au/BSL/Welcome.do;jsessionid=18B7E77E1C562BB529BDA7568E0F1B25.caosl

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